Repertory

A weekly roundup of what else is screening around town.

By Matt Prigge
Add Comment Add Comment | Comments: 0 | Posted Apr. 23, 2008

Share this Story:

The Day You'll Love Me/ Looking for an Icon

(1998/2005) (Shown on video/Beta SP): The last image of Che Guevara--snapped just after his death, with his open-eyed corpse striking a Christlike pose--gets a half-hour worth of context and analysis in The Day You'll Love Me, which spends most of its time chatting with the hapless photographer. Looking for an Icon grabs the baton and runs with it, taking a thoughtful examination of some of the more memorable winners of the World Press Photo of the Year. In each case the image's lack of context is its best quality; surely it would spoil Eddie Adams' famous photo of a Viet Cong prisoner being executed a bit to know that Adams was pro-'Nam and an admirer of the general who pulled the trigger. Similarly it doesn't matter if the young man in Charlie Cole's iconic Tiananmen Square photo was run over by that tank or not, nor that the last image of Salvador Allende, taken by an anonymous snapper, isn't in fact the last image of Salvador Allende. Restless and head-spinning, Icon imagines the life outside of the frame as well as the medium's limitations. As one interviewee says, such traumatic photos, often snapped in other parts of the world, exist so we can "shirk our responsibility." B

/

B+ Wed., April 23, 7pm.

Zygosis/Tango of Slaves

(1991/1994) (Shown on Beta SP): A 101 and so much more, the short doc Zygosis tackles the work of John Heartfield, a German dadaist whose satirical photomontages targeted Herr Hitler. Using computer animation, Zygosis finds lively 3-D ways to reproduce some of his more striking work, conveying information in eye-popping ways. Continuing the Germany trend is Tango of Slaves, Ilan Ziv's diaristic feature-length exploration of the disparity between the way mass culture reproduces the Warsaw ghettos--not just in photos, but also in movies like the then-just-released Schindler's List--and his father's memories of living there. "I was filled with memories of events that I never experienced," Ziv remarks late in, troubled both by the watering down of history and the way photos and movies essentially usurp the truth. Both: B Thurs., April 24, 7pm.

Remembrance of Things to Come/Ringl and Pit

(2001/1996) (Shown on Beta SP): Focusing on Paris between the wars, Remembrance of Things to Come is a photomontage of images of Marcel Duchamp and his ilk snapped by Denise Bellon and arranged by her daughter Yannick and legendary cine-essayist Chris Marker. Just like Marker's most famous film La Jet´┐Że, Things to Come creates a kind of story while chewing on the idea of memory and its relation to photography, particularly how photos only partly "capture reality." This experimental, haunting work is followed by Ringl and Pit, a more or less straightforward double-bio of Grete Stein and Ellen Auerbach, female photographers who thrived in prewar Germany. A-

/

B Fri., April 25, 7pm.

Magnum Photos Night

(Shown on video): Founded in 1947 by the likes of Robert Capa and Henri Cartier-Bresson, Magnum Photos is the world's premier photography cooperative, an agency that allows its members the rights to their photos. This afternoon dedicated to the organization begins with the 2000 doc Magnum Photos: The Changing of a Myth, a mostly straightforward doc on its history, its standards, its strict induction policies and how it not so smoothly handles change. Afterward there will follow seven 10-minute short docs by Magnum members, tackling everything from the Mexican-American border to the life of an English paparazzo. Sat., April 26, 2pm.

Confidential Report

(1955) (Shown on film): Unlike other not-quite-complete Orson Welles films (The Magnificent Ambersons, The Trial, et al.), there's no definitive version of his cheapie Eurotrash spy film Mr. Arkadin. Instead there are five, each with its own differences, including whole sequences. I-House opts for the cut titled (generically) Confidential Report, which was completed by producer Louis Dolivet after he booted a dilly-dallying Welles from the editing room. But in any form it's a delightfully ramshackle mess, with Welles as an ominous billionaire who hires a con man to find out what's definitively known about him--partly because he himself doesn't know. (Any resemblance to Citizen Kane is, of course, intentional.) Like much of Welles' Euro fare, everything's on the cheap, from star Robert Arden (a thrift store Joseph Cotten) to the more-obvious-than-usual sound dubbing to Welles' own ridiculously fake beard. Welles originally envisioned an elaborate flashback structure, but the film might be more mysterious in its mostly linear form, with gaping holes hopped over thanks to the breakneck pace. Watching it is akin to doing a puzzle with a quarter of the pieces missing. Stay afterward for a discussion group with I-House curator and projectionist Robert Cargni. B+ Sat., April 26, 7pm.

Little Theater

$5. 7141 Germantown Ave. 215.247.3020. www.mtairyvideolibrary.com The Savages

(2007) (Shown on DVD): In which Tamara Jenkins, last seen with The Slums of Beverly Hills in 1998, returns. Welcome back. B+ Fri., April 25-Sat., April 26, 8pm; and Sun., April 27, 7pm.

Wooden Shoe Books

Free. 508 S. Fifth St. 215.413.0999. www.woodenshoebooks.com Emma Goldman: An Exceedingly Dangerous Woman

(Shown on DVD): Once dubbed "the most dangerous woman in America," Lithuanian-born Emma Goldman gets a PBS doc, which reveals that she earned the tag by not only lobbying for birth control rights but also railing against military conscription. (Not reviewed.) Sat., April 26, 7:30pm.

Prev| Page: 1 2 3 |Next
Add to favoritesAdd to Favorites PrintPrint Send to friendSend to Friend

COMMENTS

ADD COMMENT

Rate:
(HTML and URLs prohibited)

MORE

Article:
Butch, Sundance and More

Article:
Repertory

Article:
Repertory

Article:
Repertory

Article:
Repertory

Article:
Repertory

Article:
Repertory

Article:
Repertory