Repertory

A weekly roundup of what else is screening around town.

By Matt Prigge
Add Comment Add Comment | Comments: 0 | Posted Feb. 13, 2008

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Shorts for Teens (1956/1953) (Shown on film): Aimed toward those 12 and up, this hour-long program offers fare from around the world, including Norway's Home Game, Canada's The Danish Poet and two by Bill Plympton: Guide Dog and The Fan and the Flower. (Not reviewed.) Sat., Feb. 16, 2pm.

Monkey Business (1952) (Shown on film): Not to be confused with the above-par Marx Brothers movie, Howard Hawks' comedy is only slightly less anarchic. After accidentally inventing then imbibing a youth serum, chemistry professor Cary Grant--along with wife Ginger Rogers--psychologically revert to children, harassing, among others, a cusp-of-fame Marilyn Monroe. Almost unwatchably nuts, which, of course, is the point. B+ Sun., Feb. 17, 2pm.



County Theater


$3.50-$8.50. 20 E. State St., Doylestown. 215.345.6789. www.countytheater.org

An Arctic Tale (2007) (Shown on DVD): Ostensibly meant to show the harsh realities of living way up north, this doc cutes up walruses and a family of polar bears, complete with a fart scene. You know, for the kids. Queen Latifah narrates. (Not reviewed.) Sat., Feb. 16, 11am.




International House

$5-$7. 3701 Chestnut St. 215.387.5125. www.ihousephilly.org

A Walk into the Sea: Danny Williams and the Warhol Factory + Danny Williams' Factory Films (2007) (Shown on video): Esther B. Robinson's doc opens with two mysteries: Why did her uncle, film editor and obscure Andy Warhol collaborator Danny Williams, disappear one day in 1966? And what function did he play in Warhol's Factory? The journey Robinson makes takes her to the scattered remains of the Warhol scene, with the likes of Brigid Berlin, Paul Morrissey, John Cale, Chuck Wein and Gerard Malanga ruminating on the era as Robinson splices in footage Williams shot--their faces ancient and their antics considerably dialed-down. Alas, Robinson's search for the truth about her uncle proves futile. Friday night's screening (though not Saturday's) will be followed with a 70-minute program of Williams' Factory films, most of them played silent. Those that aren't will be accompanied by T. Griffin and Catherine McRae. B Fri., Feb. 15, 7pm, and Sat., Feb. 16, 5pm.

Spirit of the Beehive (1973) (Shown on film): Good news, everyone! In honor of their 30th anniversary, Film at I-House will dedicate one slot a month to films from the vaults of national treasure Janus Films, owner of most of the classics of international cinema (most of which find their way into the Criterion Collection). First up is Victor Erice's elusive meditation on childhood in Franco's Spain. After seeing Frankenstein, a young girl broods on death, decay, monsters and the war-weary detachment of her parents. Surely among the gentlest films ever made, it's akin to a 95-minute whisper. B+ Sat., Feb. 16, 8pm.

Enemies of Happiness (2006) (Shown on Beta SP): I-House's annual series of selections from the Human Rights Watch International Film Festival doesn't really get going until next week. But make sure to pencil in a viewing of Eva Mulvad's doc, which tells of Malalai Joya, a woman who gained fame for challenging the power of warlords in 2003 Afghanistan. Paired with the film will be the short Sari's Mother, the story that wound up snipped out of James Longley's amazing doc Iraq in Fragments. (Not reviewed.) Wed., Feb. 20, 7pm.




Little Theater

$5. 7141 Germantown Ave. 215.247.3020. www.mtairyvideolibrary.com

The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford (2007) (Shown on DVD): Memo to AMPAS: Casey Affleck gives a lead performance. A- Fri., Feb. 15-Sat., Feb. 16, 8pm; and Sun., Feb. 17, 7pm.




National Constitution Center

Free. 525 Arch St. 215.409.6700. www.whyy.org

Iron Ladies of Liberia (2007) (Shown on film): WHYY hosts a special advance screening of this doc on Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf, who in 2005 became the first woman elected president of the African nation of Liberia. Following the film will be a discussion panel including honorary consul general of Liberia Dr. Teta Bank and Amie Sarnor, a Constitution High sophomore who grew up amid the nation's civil war. (Not reviewed.)

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