The Five Best (and Five Worst) Places to Bike in Philly

By Daniel Denvir
Add Comment Add Comment | Comments: 39 | Posted Jun. 15, 2011

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Best: Spruce and Pine streets in Center City.

Photo by Ryan Strand

Gritty, old Philadelphia is the most bike-riding big city in America. According to the Bicycle Coalition of Greater Philadelphia, biking in Philadelphia has exploded since 2000, when the rate was just .86 percent, nearly doubling between 2005 and 2008 alone.

This city has more bike commuters per capita (2.16 percent) than Chicago (1.15 percent) and New York (.61 percent). While that’s still behind Portland (5.81 percent) and San Francisco (2.98 percent), we’re ninth out of the 70 biggest cities. Some Philly neighborhoods (South, Center City and West) have biking rates that rival anywhere.

Andrew Stober, chief of staff to the Mayor’s Office of Transportation and Utilities, credits Philly’s grid system, narrow streets (“If you think about New York, all of the numbered avenues are wider than Broad Street!”), flat terrain and the fact that many people live within a cozy three-mile bike to work.

The city and its bike advocates have a plan in the works to make Philadelphia into a bicycle utopia, from what the Bicycle Coalition calls an “excellent big city for biking” into a “world class-bicycling city.” We’re talking Portland, Montreal, Amsterdam style biking.

I'm cruising around town on a Friday afternoon with Nicholas Mirra, communications coordinator at the Bicycle Coalition, to discuss how great Philly biking is and how it will get better. First, Mirra guided me down the next jewels set to be added to the city’s be-spoked crown: north-south bike lanes down 10th and 13th streets, between (give or take a few blocks) Spring Garden and South streets. The east-west bike lanes on Pine and Spruce streets installed in 2009 have transformed Center City biking, and the new bike lanes will make your trip from Center City and South Philly to Northern Liberties, Kensington, Fishtown or points beyond a whole lot easier.

The northbound bike lane will head down 13th Street, passing through the Gayborhood and the Marcie Turney-Valerie Safran restaurant empire, across Market and through the northern tip of Chinatown just above Reading Terminal Market, discontinuing up past the Standard Tap on Second Street.

The southbound route begins at Spring Garden right by the Spaghetti Warehouse’s colossal and now empty shell, and then down 10th Street. The path will traverse the neighborhood’s various post-industrial mysteries, into the heart of Chinatown, past the Gallery mall and Jefferson Hospital, ending at Lombard, where you can make your own way through South Philly’s maze-like streets.

According to the Bicycle Coalition, the Pine/Walnut lanes were the “first innovative bikeway design installed in Philadelphia”—which means it was the first time that real-deal anything had been done for bike infrastructure in this city. The lanes are a hit: Bikers have flocked to the buffered lanes and cleared out of car-dominant streets. And it’s only the beginning. Imagine a protected bike track on Washington, or peaceful bicycle boulevards through small South Philly residential streets.

“I think we’re making a lot of progress,” says Stober. “But when it comes to building out a regional trail network, the primary obstacle is funding.”

But the time to bike is now, so PW assembled a list of five of the city’s best, and worst, places to bike. There was heavy competition on both sides: the numerous horrible places to bike like Lindbergh Avenue, Roosevelt Boulevard, along the generally nightmarish Delaware waterfront, and Columbus and Delaware avenues. And then there are great places like Pennypack Park.

Best:

 1) The Schuylkill River Trail, which hugs the east riverside from Center City to East Falls, is clearly amazing. West River Drive has a somewhat bumpy trail on the river’s west side, but on weekends, the road is shut down, and you can rocket back to the Art Museum after crossing over the ancient and beautiful East Falls Bridge. “I love West River Drive when it’s closed to cars,” says Mirra. “Five minutes out from Spring Garden, I feel very far removed from the cars-and-concrete vibe of most of Philadelphia.”

There is a campaign to “Complete the Schuylkill River Trail,” making it possible to bicycle all the way to Valley Forge, which currently breaks up twice near Manyunk.

New trails will also ease the route to Forbidden Drive, the spectacular car-free road through the Wissahickon Valley.

“It’s cooler, especially on less humid evenings, than the surrounding neighborhoods and the ambiance feels more like a glen in the Poconos than a city park,” says John Boyle, advocacy director at the Bicycle Coalition.

And a new trail will connect the Schuylkill to Southwest Philly’s scandalously underutilized Bartram’s Gardens, and then up to a trail that will run down 58th Street, through West Philly’s Cobb’s Creek Trail. A boardwalk connecting the end of trail at locust to South Street Bridge will be ready next summer.

2) Cobbs Creek Trail: Though Cobbs Creek Park is making a comeback, almost no one uses the fantastic bike path stretching from 63rd and Market streets to 70th and Cobbs Creek. The trail cuts alongside and through the large forest park that separates West Philly from the Delaware County suburbs. There are places where the trail dips completely into the woods, and all that can be heard are birds, crickets and, God willing, a cool breeze rustling the leaves. Once the Schuylkill River Trail is completed, you will be able to bike Cobbs Creek to Bartram’s Garden, and then all the way to Center City and Valley Forge.

3) Bicycle Coalition Executive Director Alex Doty’s “favorite place hardly anyone bikes” is Belmont Plateau in West Fairmount Park. It takes a little huffing and puffing to get to the top of the hill, but you will be glad that you made it. A huge grass field extends down the hill, with a nice picnic spot well shaded by a tree. The view of Philly’s skyline is spectacular.

4) I cannot believe that I had never biked through the Navy Yard. The 1,200-acre property at Broad Street’s southern tip was shut down by the Navy in 1995 and is now home to the Urban Outfitters office park, a breathtaking and highway-free shoreline along the Delaware River, rusting battleships and an entire abandoned neighborhood. The doors of the empty rowhomes are plastered with “No Trespassing” signs, and the place is eerie in a post-nuclear apocalypse sort of way. There’s a forlorn basketball hoop off the sidewalk, and a bedraggled set of Christmas lights limply strung from a porch. There’s an empty motel, too.

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COMMENTS

Comments 1 - 39 of 39
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1. Anonymous said... on Jun 15, 2011 at 09:05AM

“To the guy in the photo- WEAR A HELMET!”

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2. LKS said... on Jun 15, 2011 at 09:33AM

“Lombard Street should be on this list. I am always shocked when i see people biking along this too narrow for 2 lanes of cars so why add a bicycle street. Ditto for Walnut.

Having just returned from a 3 yr stint in NYC I am really pleased to see how biking in philly has exploded in such a short period of time. However I am equally horrified to see how many people don't wear helmets. (though to be fair not as many people ride opposite to traffic as in NYC, so we are one up on that- yeah!)

People please wear your helmets. They save lives. Doesn't matter if you are the best biker on the planet, the cell phone yapping, text messaging driver that hits you will not care.

Ride safe,

LKS”

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3. Mickie said... on Jun 15, 2011 at 09:38AM

“This is great news, but what about those of us who commute north-south on the west of Broad St.? There's a lane on 22nd St. which puts me smack dab in the scariest neighborhood for a girl to ride alone.

Please keep it up! I'd like to see the kind of lane protection Amsterdam has here in the City of Brotherly Love. That'd be ideal.”

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4. Not a bike hater, but... said... on Jun 15, 2011 at 09:58AM

“...what would also be "ideal" is some accountability among CC cyclists for their riding behavior. As a longtime resident of this wonderful, walkable city, I'm becoming convinced that the biggest threat to my safety as a pedestrian does not come from aggressive/distracted automobile drivers, but from the many reckless nitwit cyclists who routinely run red lights & stop signs, go the wrong way on one-way streets, and ride on the sidewalk — all at maximum speed of course, as if it's a birthright or something.”

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5. Anonymous said... on Jun 15, 2011 at 10:29AM

“I don't understand the helmet issue. If people don't want to wear a helmet - who cares? Its entirely silly (and don't give me the song and dance about health care costs)”

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6. flowerlvr66 said... on Jun 15, 2011 at 10:45AM

“A cyclist/bike must follow the same rules as a car. Ride on right hand side of road, stop at stop signs & red lights & be VISIBLE!! When on trails, announce when passing others & just use common sense!!”

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7. bthny said... on Jun 15, 2011 at 10:47AM

“"The northbound bike lane will head down 13th Street, passing through the Gayborhood and the Marcie Turney-Valerie Safran restaurant empire, across Market and through the northern tip of Chinatown just above Reading Terminal Market, discontinuing up past the Standard Tap on Second Street."

That's an...interesting sense of geography.

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8. Anonymous said... on Jun 15, 2011 at 11:44AM

“I don't understand why this article doesn't mention sidewalks. I see more and more cyclists on sidewalks, even on streets with large dedicated bike lanes. Riding bikes on streets is for suckers.”

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9. Anonymous said... on Jun 15, 2011 at 12:03PM

“The article doesn't mention sidewalks because riding on the sidewalk, if you're over 12 years old, is illegal. The police are now giving tickets to bikers who do that.”

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10. brendancalling said... on Jun 15, 2011 at 12:03PM

“@not a bike hater: I'm in NYC pretty much every other weekend, and so i get to see what bike culture is like in other cities. Speaking as a bicyclist AND a driver, Philadelphians have NO IDEA how good they have it, and how well-behaved our bicyclists are. Yeah, we have some bad apples, but in comparison to the anarchy I see on NY streets, we oughta have halos over our heads”

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11. A F said... on Jun 15, 2011 at 12:17PM

“"Baltimore avenue, the main drag of queer, anarchist, vegan, and crusty west philly" How about poly cultural, multi ethnic, creatively saturated, and open minded?? Its ok though people like you keep my rent cheap. suprised you didn't write "where the black people live"”

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12. cyclist said... on Jun 15, 2011 at 01:06PM

“I LOVE the bike lanes on Spruce and Pine, but I challenge any cyclist to ride for a few minutes and not have to swerve into the traffic lane because there is a car parked in the bike lane. Especially on Sundays. What I have reverted to doing is spitting on the cars that are parked in the bike line. One one particular occasion, I smashed the car's side mirror with my U-lock. This is not some pent-up adolescent aggression, but a calculated strategy to convince cars not to park in a bike lane. Cops don't ticket enough, so the next step of deterrence can come from the cyclists themselves. How many people would park in a bike lane if every time they did, their mirrors were smashed. This would solve the problem in a hurry. I urge all cyclists to join me in the crusade to clean up Philly's bike lanes.”

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13. Nicholas said... on Jun 15, 2011 at 01:17PM

“@cyclist I'm a cyclist too and use Pine/Spruce a lot. Hate to say it because I know it's frustrating, but cars are allowed to load/unload in bike lanes. They can't PARK, but they can load/unload with flashers. It's legal. Reasoning is that moving temporary stopping to the bike lane keeps the single lane of car traffic unobstructed. And it's much safer for bicycles to cut into the car lane, than cars to cut into the bike lane. So I'd advise you not to get too righteous with that U-lock.”

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14. Katherine said... on Jun 15, 2011 at 01:56PM

“I think bike lanes are wonderful and use them frequently, and while it's annoying when cars are parked there, it's not a slight against cyclists. Drivers are stupid and selfish to other drivers, too, and it's a bit over-the-top to expect that cars will be more considerate to bike lanes than they are to regular lanes. Cars block and park in inappropriate places all the time -- cyclists need to be more like drivers and just deal with it.”

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15. Emily said... on Jun 15, 2011 at 03:23PM

“Pennypack Park anyone? Yeah they might have had a few rabid beavers, but that is by far my favorite place to bike in the city. You can't beat miles of a smooth, gently hilly trail that follows along a beautiful creek and feeds into a family-friendly picturesque park on the Delaware River. I am disappointed in PW for forgetting one of the Philadelphia's true gems.”

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16. Anonymous said... on Jun 15, 2011 at 03:59PM

“I have had many near misses with cyclists being a pedestrian, and in my car it's like a video game. Cyclists flying out from every direction, they don't stop at red lights or stop signs, and they get mad at ME when they are the ones not obeying any traffic laws or any kind of basic road or sidewalk courtesy. I can't swivel my head 360 degrees to see where they are going to pop out next.

It was bound to happen. I was driving down a narrow cobblestone street with a stop sign at the end. I pulled forward to look at the one way oncoming traffic. A cyclist, riding on the sidewalk, against oncoming traffic, flew into the intersection and I knocked her off her bike because the traffic had cleared and I could proceed.

Thank goodness she was not hurt and her bike was fine except for some misalignment in the handlebars. I never saw her.

We all need to be more careful out there!

PS. Smashing side view mirrors is despicable, by the way.”

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17. Andrew said... on Jun 15, 2011 at 06:56PM

“It certainly is more difficult to drive when people are riding bicycles quickly on the sidewalk. One of the problems we have is that hitting people with a car isn't particularly illegal, and certainly is never punished with substantial fines or jail time. So when people don't spend the kind of attention that's required to safely operate a massive car in the complex environment of a city, and they then inevitably hit a jogger or a person on a bicycle, they say 'it's bound to happen', rather than going to jail.”

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18. Anonymous said... on Jun 15, 2011 at 08:43PM

“Going to jail? That's a little harsh. It's called an accident for a reason. No one is intentionally hitting people, whether they are on a bike and hit a pedestrian or in a car and hit a cyclist. Plus the cyclist is at fault here. Not on a bike path, going against traffic on a sidewalk and not stopping to look when approaching an intersection.”

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19. sonja said... on Jun 16, 2011 at 09:54AM

“I don't even like bike lanes! I think this is a experienced biker v baby biker issue. Bike lanes are GHETTOs. Once a place is made for you, you're not allowed any other place. When I get in the left lane because I'm about to turn left, cars yell at me, "get in the bike lane." Also, bike lanes are placed at the most dangerous part of the street. I want to ride in the middle of the left lane. I'm a vehicle. For big fast streets, like broad street where even the left lane is going more than 20 mph, they should put the bike lane in the middle of the street, where the left turn lane is. Bikes can share w left turners. They can take out the useless medians.”

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20. kelvyn said... on Jun 16, 2011 at 03:36PM

“I've been a daily bike commuter for about a decade now and I think a lot of the conflicts we see on the road are a combination of a bike riders experience (or lack thereof) and (in)tolerance. My approach is similar to Sonja's but I like the bike lanes -- when they work well. For most of my ride to work from West Philly along Spring Garden, the bike lanes are cool, but as Sonja notes, you inevitably get to a point where you need to move out of the lane and hang with car traffic. Broad & Spring Garden is a good example, with the food trucks and construction, the bike lane eastbound is useless. Learn to ride off the saddle for visibility and maneuverability, and be forgiving to other commuters, if they're on foot, biking or in a car. I think spitting on someone's car cause they got in your way is stupid and potentially fatal. Smile and move on, it'll keep the ulcers away.”

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21. Anonymous said... on Jun 16, 2011 at 09:01PM

“@not a bike hater, but...: the number one danger on my daily 10 mile RT commute into CC is pedestrians, not cars. Pedestrians walk out into the bike lane to wait for the light, forcing me to brake suddenly or swerve into the path of cars, walk out in front of me because they have no ability to judge speed or are texting and relying on their ears rather than their eyes, or have an entitled attitude about wandering into traffic because walking is a birthright or something. I don't do any of the things you describe and I still have close calls with pedestrians because of their behavior multiple times a week. Pedestrians and cyclists actually have much in common but we are never going to be able to make common cause until pedestrians start to behave responsibly and not blame others for near-accidents they cause. And if you are the single solitary person in CC who actually waits on the sidewalk for the light to turn green and never jaywalks, I apologize for maligning you.”

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22. @harveymilk said... on Jun 17, 2011 at 07:26AM

“How funny that "Manayunk" autocorrected to "Manhunt" in the description of the Schuylkill River Trail...”

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23. Mike said... on Jun 17, 2011 at 08:03AM

“Who's the hot dude on the cover? And can you give him my phone number?”

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24. Louis said... on Jun 17, 2011 at 03:18PM

“Add Washington Ave bike lanes to WORST.
I'd rather ride down Carpenter or any other sleepy side street during rush hour than play chicken with fork lifts while skidding through spilled gravel, and construction debris.”

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25. Anonymous said... on Jun 17, 2011 at 03:38PM

“Henry Ave should be listed in the worst column. It looks like it would be great, but there is so much debris in the bike lane, traffic moves ridiculously fast and the bike lane just ends so suddenly.”

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26. Anonymous said... on Jun 17, 2011 at 08:15PM

“Obviously, the author has never tried biking on Germantown Ave: no shoulder, SEPTA buses, trolley rails, and (oh yeah!) cobble stones.”

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27. Jean said... on Jun 20, 2011 at 01:46PM

“What about the Wissahickon? A long stretch of beautiful trail that connects Ridge Avenue to the far northern border of the city. In terms of the conflicts between those of us on bikes, on foot or in cars, in Philly, there is more than enough rudeness to go around. No one group behaves well all of the time. One thing that would make bike riding much safer is that runners and walker (or roller bladers) with both ears plugged with music cannot hear polite requests to move over on the sidewalk (i.e. on the river drives), veer into the middle of the sidewalk and then are angry when startled by a passing bike. Leave one ear open to know what is happening around you, everyone. You and everyone else will be much safer.”

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28. Anonymous said... on Jun 21, 2011 at 10:43AM

“Only good thing about this article is that the author's reference to Manayunk as "Manhunt". It makes me laugh.

Everything else in the article is pathetic The bicycle coalition is destroying the allure of cycling by demanding all these silly bike lanes and rules.
I like those who yell to me "where's your helmet" while they are smoking cigarettes and jaywalking at the same time.”

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29. MKK said... on Jun 21, 2011 at 10:50AM

“Its unfortunate this article and the author, along with bike lanes, Bicycle Coalition encourages that biking is dangerous, when in fact it really is not dangerous at all. Riding a bike is tremendous fun, but along with that one should learn how to navigate potholes, trolley tracks, open car doors, a car turning into you without seeing you, etc. utilize your senses. Accidents happen. People drive recklessly, open a car door on you. And to dsicourage people from riding Delaware Av, Girard, Baltimore Av and many other places just because the shoulder is unequal or there are trolley tracks or big warehouse businesses? Unfortunately bike lanes give riders a false sense of security and entitlement. And the silly hlmet comments! Philadelphia is one of the easiest places to ride a bike in and a great place to ride. It just seems that the author and a lot of people want to make it into this candyland fantasy place where there would be no car doors open, no potoles, not in my bike lane!”

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30. david sylvester said... on Jun 21, 2011 at 11:01AM

“Pls review my bike book “Traveling at the Speed of Life”? on 9/11 I lost Philadelphian Kevin Bowser and bicycled North America, Washington state- Philly- to honor him in ‘02 and bicycled Africa, Cairo -Cape Town, ‘04. My North American trip took me to the edge of what I believed possible- Africa pushed me completely over.

I planned to pedal S A- Columbia to Argentina- but was stopped when a DUI hit and injured me. But my trips had steeled my will- I was bicycling Asia- Istanbul to Beijing- in ‘07.

ESPN contacted me and my words- story garnered two million hits. I was so touched that I wanted to do more but something a different and bicycled NA again -San Diego to NYC- in ‘08 with weekly charitable stops.

I wrote ‘Traveling at the Speed of Life’- a book about how the simple acts, meetings and things that I’ve encountered around the globe have touched me. GO TO AMAZON - after a decade of tumult people need a good story about a man searching for hugs, smiles, high5’s.”

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31. Anonymous said... on Jun 24, 2011 at 12:45PM

“PW, why do you hate on West Philly so much? Here we're all "crusty" and in your review of Desi Chaat House you described a neighborhood with beautiful old houses and a vibrant culture as some kind of backwoods.

But I do agree, Baltimore Ave is a nightmare to bike. I've got a nice big scar on my leg from when a car pulled out of a parking space right in front of me and made me swerve straight into the trolley tracks. Tires hit the tracks and I skidded about five feet down the street. Jerk didn't even see if I was OK.

Really, though, show some West Philly some love. We're one of the most vibrant and diverse parts of the city and you just perpetuate the perception that no one in their right mind should ever dare go west of Penn.”

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32. Paul said... on Jun 29, 2011 at 09:09AM

“Whenever i hear the motorist/cyclist/pedestriest argument my mind always settles on this poem
"The Drunken Driver Has the Right Of Way"
By Ethan Coen

The loudest have the final say,
The wanton win, the rash hold sway,
The realist's rules of order say
The drunken driver has the right of way.

The Kubla Khan can butt in line;
The biggest brute can take what's mine;
When heavyweights break wind, that's fine;
No matter what a judge might say
The drunken driver has the right of way.

The guiltiest feel free of guilt;
Who care not bloom; who worry, wilt;
Plans laid better are rarely built
For forethought seldom rules the day;
The drunken driver has the right of way.

The most attentive and unfailing
Attentiveness if unavailing
Wheresoever fools are flailing;
Wisdom there is held at bay;
The drunken driver has the right of way.

De jure is de facto's slave;
The most foolhardy beat the brave;
Brass routs restraint; low lies high's grave;
When conscience leads you”

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33. Anonymous said... on Jul 20, 2011 at 06:09PM

“The bike lanes are going to be the straw that broke the camel's back for me and my family. I have two young kids and biking is just not practical. The Spruce Street bike lane added significant time from my work (Jefferson) to my kids across town. Now, the bike lane on 10th street not only doubles that time, but I am losing patients because of it. The biggest gripe about coming to Jefferson was getting there and parking, and in the last week it's been horrendous. I have not seen gridlock like this in the twenty years that I've lived in Philadelphia. Suburbs here I come!”

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34. Greg LeMond's Mom said... on Jul 27, 2011 at 10:25AM

“I'm ok with breaking mirrors and spitting on cars parked in the bike lane as long as I can stick my broom handle through your spokes as you ride on my pavement. If you prefer, I could "clothes line" you off your Trek with my forearm. Philly schools are literally falling apart and these numbnuts (intentional pun) want funding so that they can get from river to river without breaking a sweat.”

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35. Anonymous said... on Aug 3, 2011 at 08:56AM

“If the one page spread that was important enough to have one of the only cover lines you'd think someone would have spent more time with it, let alone gave it more space to be a real article to be featured on the cover.

In citing the north/south bike lanes your writer mentions the lane going up 13th street thru Chinatown, and Reading Terminal, Really? How about under the huge new addition to the convention center? Did anyone actually ride the bike lanes before writing this story? And discontinuing at second street to Standard Tap. Who checks this stuff? Or who is paying you guys to mention establishments in the city that have no relation to the stories you write.

"Manhunt" where is this place? Your staff is embarrassing itself for not reading and properly spelling areas they are reporting on.

The whole thing begs to be revisited again, especially since it was a cover story. Total fail guys, really. Birdcage bound for your paper, maybe all the time.”

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36. mazin said... on Sep 13, 2011 at 02:36PM

“http://bicyclestore.makeyouronlinemoneynow.com
visit the best bicycle store online where you will find the best bicycles at the best cheapest prices!”

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37. mazin said... on Sep 13, 2011 at 02:36PM

“http://bicyclestore.makeyouronlinemoneynow.com
visit the best bicycle store online where you will find the best bicycles at the best cheapest prices!”

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38. Spencer said... on Dec 19, 2012 at 12:42PM

“To those who have complained that the bike lanes have had a negative impact on your automobile commute time...I am glad – this will go a long way to discourage people from driving around CC and encourage walking and public transit. Philadelphia truly has a small downtown, and unless you are commuting from a suburb without any access to transit, or carpooling with a full car of people, I see no excuse for daily driving.”

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39. mikebike said... on May 21, 2014 at 06:42PM

“Anytime you see a vehicle illegally blocking the bike lane or a cab using a bike lane, call 911, the PPA, or the media. You might think it won't make a difference, but eventually the city will get sick of hearing complaints and dispatch their collection crews to generate more revenue. When riding the bike lanes on Chestnut and Walnut, prevent cars and cabs from using the bike lane by slowing in front of them (not during rush hour). Some cyclist will have to become marters to bring awareness to the issue. If enough cyclist get hurt, the city will have to do something. Follow the rules of the rode and pray. If you have the resources, invest in a helmet cam, that way you can prove who was at fault, if anything you can use it to record your last words. Remember, if you want to pick a fight as a cyclist , YOU WILL LOSE. Wear a helmet. If you are a cyclist you know you have broken the law at some point, we all do. Wait for green even if you feel like a idiot, set an example.”

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