Dorms For Dummies

Decorating tips for college living.

By PW Staff
Add Comment Add Comment | Comments: 0 | Posted Aug. 25, 2010

Share this Story:

 

1. After all these years, no one knows why dorm-room beds are extra long. Are college students especially tall? RE Style Twin XL Comforter, $19.99. Matching XL Twin sheets, $19.99. Target, 1 Mifflin St. 215.463.7311. target.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

2. Enjoy pix of your friends as you leave them notes asking where your toothbrush is. Chalk Board Picture Frame, $18. Smak Parlour, 219 Market St. 215.625.4551. smakparlour.com

 

 

 

 

 

3. This is a conversation piece. “Hey, do you like my painting/bottle opener? Allow me to open this High Life for you. Wanna make out?” Wall Mount Bottle Opener, $34. Art Star Gallery & Boutique, 623 N. Second St. 215.238.1557. artstarphilly.com

 

Page: 1 2 3 |Next
Add to favoritesAdd to Favorites PrintPrint Send to friendSend to Friend

COMMENTS

ADD COMMENT

Rate:
(HTML and URLs prohibited)

Related Content

College 101: A Student's Guide to Navigating Philly
By PW Staff

Great Places to Eat After Midnight 1. Little Pete’s, 216 S. 17th St. Wedged into a tiny nook near Rittenhouse Square, Little Pete’s serves up some of the finest diner food in Philly, 24 hours a day. Stop in any hour of the night and sample the delicious American fare, as well as the waitresses’ famous bad attitudes. 2. South Street Diner, 140 South St. Another famous Philly diner, only this one is nine times the size of Little Pete’s, and they sell delicious pastries. 3. Makkah Market, 4249 Walnut St. Makkah is a hidden gem in West Philly. It’s a grocery/Muslim bookstore/dine-in and take-out restaurant that delivers Middle-Eastern food 24 hours a day. ’Nuff said. 4....

Related Content

College Majors You Never Knew Existed
By Lucy McGuigan

Take a careful look at these letters. Think the choice in typeface was arbitrary? Think again. Each font used in print conveys a subtle message to readers.

Related Content

Hittin' the Books
By Matt Petrillo

After decades of students’ complaints, Congress has taken note. A federal law that took effect July 1 mandates more transparency between college textbook publishers and the students and faculty they serve.